Art History, Culture

Snapchat x Art History

Snapchats+art history+perfectly vulgar commentary= BRILLANT.

This may require some quirky sense of humour but I had a few good laughs (okay…you got me, I cackled at each one)

You no longer need an art history degree to have an appreciation of art. My blog post a few months ago about the Selfie Phenomena in Museums and Snapchat Art History are the perfect examples of how contemporary culture combines new and old, and old school education and completely paradoxical and politically-incorrect captions for pure enjoyment.

I promise you these are good…

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Seriously, you need to get check more of these out.

Pictures via Charles Saatchi Blog, Buzzfeed

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Uncategorized

It’s my birthday!

Today is a big day for me. It’s my 22nd birthday. And although I already dread turning 23, why not celebrate with you all with a piece of cake?

Martha Rich’s illustrations are the most quirkiest and eccentric drawings and paintings I’ve ever seen. It’s like if you gave someone a hallucinatory drug and asked them to draw something, it would be Rich’s illustrations. They’re a jumbled mess, but it all makes sense somehow. If some of you are keen on the show “Girls”, you might have noticed one of her lovely cake illustrations in the show.

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Chocolate Electric via Martha Rich

"Hardcore" via Martha Rich

“Yes Please” via Illustration and Animation

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“Hardcore” via Martha Rich

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“Deal With It Later” via Martha Rich

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“Ego Maniac” via Martha Rich

This is how I feel about dessert. Picture via Mocoloco

This is how I feel about dessert. Picture via Mocoloco

Thanks to all my friends and family who have wished me a happy birthday! It’s going to be a crazy-fun year and I’m excited to see where it takes me.

Lastly, this has nothing to do with cake or my birthday. But it’s my motto, it’s my birthday…and I do what I want. And now I’m going to go eat a slice of cake.

Martha Rich via Ritchie Ace Camps

Martha Rich via Ritchie Ace Camps

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Art History

Andy Warhol//”13 Most Wanted Men”

You think of Andy Warhol and you see…

Orange Marilyn (1962) by Warhol via dailymail.co.uk

Orange Marilyn (1962) by Warhol via dailymail.co.uk

But would you expect anything like this?

Warhol's "13 Most Wanted Men" at the 1964 World Fair in Queens, New York before it was removed (picture via artnews)

Warhol’s “13 Most Wanted Men” at the 1964 World Fair in Queens, New York before it was removed (picture via artnews)

I might be exaggerating but Warhol is one of the most widely-known modern artists of his time, and a piece like this is FAR from the glamourous silkscreens and photographs of Marilyn Monroe, Edie Sedgwick, or Liz Taylor. What’s more is this mural caused such an uproar that it upset Robert Moses the fair’s planner and urban planner of most of New York City, and other officials such as architect and planner Philip Johnson, and New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller 50 years ago when Warhol’s13 Most Wanted Men was silkscreened on the walls of the New York State Pavilion for the 1964 World Fair. Warhol chose these grainy mugshots from a 1962 Most Wanted booklet produced by the New York Police Department and a few days later, it was mysteriously painted over. To this day no one knows who ordered the mural to be destroyed.

Later that summer, Warhol produced a new set of silkscreens and printed them on canvas using the original series of screens from “13 Most Wanted Men”. 50 years later, nine of these prints will be displayed for the first time at the Queens Museum for their “13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World Fair” exhibit which opens on April 27-September 7. The exhibit will feature a collection of Warhol’s works during the key years of his life focusing on art, film, protest, and gay lifestyle. The collection will also include never-before-displayed artworks from The Andy Warhol Museum archives which helps explain who ordered the destruction of Warhol’s mural 50 years ago and who was involved in creating it.

I’m not going to lie. I am a huge fan of Warhol, not only for his artwork, but for what he represented and how he changed the way we understand consumerism and modern culture.

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Contemporary Art

Paper Cutting//Ed Pien

Anyone who knows me knows I love myself a little Ed Pien. I first encountered the Canadian artist on a visit to the Art Gallery of Ontario about 5 years ago and I still absolutely love his work; he works in a range of medium, from photography to public installations to illustrations. There’s something really haunting but also delicate about his art that draws me in. His larger-than-life papercut pieces and installations are full of mystery that makes you wonder who the silhouetted figures are and why the heck they’re alone in the forest. Pien uses trees as a recurring motif in his cuts, playing with light, texture, depth, and space to portray an alluring and delicate experience. It’s definitely something you don’t see everyday…you just can’t help but gape in awe anytime you see one of his pieces in front of you.

He’s worth checking out!

Deep Water (2001) via Ed Pien

Deep Water (2001) via Ed Pien

Night Gathering (2005) via Ed Pien

Night Gathering (2005) via Ed Pien

A Forest of Thorns (2007) via via Ed Pien

A Forest of Thorns (2007) via Ed Pien

Giant Pine via via Ed Pien

Giant Pine via Ed Pien

Witching Hour (2007) via Ed Pien

Witching Hour (2007) via Ed Pien

Reckoning (2010) via Ed Pien

Reckoning (2010) via Ed Pien

Promise of Solitude (2005) via via Ed Pien

Promise of Solitude (2005) via Ed Pien

Night Gathering (2005) via Ed Pien

Night Gathering (2005) via Ed Pien

Invisible (2008) via via Ed Pien

Invisible (2008) via Ed Pien

 

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